Archive | History RSS feed for this section

How A Bill Becomes A Bill

preliminary design for the back of the 1935 dollar bill, the first to include the Great Seal of the United States, with Franklin Roosevelt’s note of approval and request for two changes. This initial version had the obverse of the seal on the left and the reverse on the right, but Roosevelt ordered them switched, and added the phrase “The Great Seal of the United States” underneath

and here she is as she is now

0 Comments

Zoos or Lose

In 1828, when Andrew Jackson was running for president, his opponents were fond of referring to him as a jackass (if only such candid discourse were permissible today). Emboldened by his detractors, Jackson embraced the image as the symbol of his campaign, re-branding the donkey as steadfast, determined, and willful, instead of wrong-headed, slow, and obstinate. Throughout his presidency, the symbol remained associated with Jackson and, to a lesser extent, the Democratic party 

In 1874, cartoonist Thomas Nast, represented the Democratic press as a donkey in lion’s clothing (though the party itself is shown as a shy fox), expressing the cartoonist’s belief that the media were acting as fear mongers, propagating the idea of Ulysses S. Grant as a potential American dictator. In Nast’s donkey-in-lion’s-clothing cartoon, the elephant –representing the Republican vote– was running scared toward a pit of chaos and inflation. The rationale behind the choice of the elephant is unclear, but Nast may have chosen it as the embodiment of a large and powerful creature, though one that tends to be dangerously careless when frightened. Alternately, the political pachyderm may have been inspired by the now little-used phrase “seeing the elephant,” a reference to war and a possible reminder of the Union victory. Whatever the reason, Nast’s popularity and consistent use of the elephant ensured that it would remain in the American consciousness as a Republican symbol

[Political Animals: Republican Elephants and Democratic Donkeys]

0 Comments

Bros Before Barnum

The Ringling Bros (Alf, John, Charles, Al and Otto) – Kings of the Circus World, 1908

and here in 1898

and in a time when they had less staches

1 Comment

Investing & Inbreasting


in October of 2006, Warren Buffett brought Bill Gates and members of the Berkshire Hathaway Board of Directors to a Hooters so they could pose for a photo with the Hooters girls that Buffett could later use for his Christmas Card. Buffett and Gates were given Hooters VIP Cards, which entitled them to free food at any of the chain’s then 435 locations in 46 states and 20 countries, exclusive of tip and alcohol [Hooters]

1 Comment
eXTReMe Tracker