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Zoos or Lose

In 1828, when Andrew Jackson was running for president, his opponents were fond of referring to him as a jackass (if only such candid discourse were permissible today). Emboldened by his detractors, Jackson embraced the image as the symbol of his campaign, re-branding the donkey as steadfast, determined, and willful, instead of wrong-headed, slow, and obstinate. Throughout his presidency, the symbol remained associated with Jackson and, to a lesser extent, the Democratic party 

In 1874, cartoonist Thomas Nast, represented the Democratic press as a donkey in lion’s clothing (though the party itself is shown as a shy fox), expressing the cartoonist’s belief that the media were acting as fear mongers, propagating the idea of Ulysses S. Grant as a potential American dictator. In Nast’s donkey-in-lion’s-clothing cartoon, the elephant –representing the Republican vote– was running scared toward a pit of chaos and inflation. The rationale behind the choice of the elephant is unclear, but Nast may have chosen it as the embodiment of a large and powerful creature, though one that tends to be dangerously careless when frightened. Alternately, the political pachyderm may have been inspired by the now little-used phrase “seeing the elephant,” a reference to war and a possible reminder of the Union victory. Whatever the reason, Nast’s popularity and consistent use of the elephant ensured that it would remain in the American consciousness as a Republican symbol

[Political Animals: Republican Elephants and Democratic Donkeys]

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Bark Angel of Death

“Tree of Dead” production background from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, 1949

[HA]

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It’s A Large World After All

It’s A Small World World’s Fair project – design concept art by Mary Blair for Disney, 1964

The It’s a Small World attraction is located in every Disney theme park around the globe. It began as a 1964 New York World’s Fair attraction in the UNICEF Pavilion, sponsored by Pepsi. Once the World’s Fair closed, it was moved to Disneyland and officially opened on June 28, 1966. Mary Blair was the driving force behind this famous attraction, and her vision, her design, her love of color, and her talent helped make this one of the most popular attractions in the world [HA]

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