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Minnie Flirt

Four deadlocked editorial meetings, a flurry of confusion and an eleventh hour telegram to Sagebrush Studios produced the Kute ‘n Kampy Kut-Up on this month’s cover. It expresses both our hard-hitting editorial policies and Sagebrush’s ob-session with female mouse knockers [National Lampoon September 1970 issue]

Disney sued the Lampoon for $11 million over this cover

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Just My Duck

Donald Duck Cleanup Model Sheet (Walt Disney Studio, 1941) [HA]

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Zoos or Lose

In 1828, when Andrew Jackson was running for president, his opponents were fond of referring to him as a jackass (if only such candid discourse were permissible today). Emboldened by his detractors, Jackson embraced the image as the symbol of his campaign, re-branding the donkey as steadfast, determined, and willful, instead of wrong-headed, slow, and obstinate. Throughout his presidency, the symbol remained associated with Jackson and, to a lesser extent, the Democratic party 

In 1874, cartoonist Thomas Nast, represented the Democratic press as a donkey in lion’s clothing (though the party itself is shown as a shy fox), expressing the cartoonist’s belief that the media were acting as fear mongers, propagating the idea of Ulysses S. Grant as a potential American dictator. In Nast’s donkey-in-lion’s-clothing cartoon, the elephant –representing the Republican vote– was running scared toward a pit of chaos and inflation. The rationale behind the choice of the elephant is unclear, but Nast may have chosen it as the embodiment of a large and powerful creature, though one that tends to be dangerously careless when frightened. Alternately, the political pachyderm may have been inspired by the now little-used phrase “seeing the elephant,” a reference to war and a possible reminder of the Union victory. Whatever the reason, Nast’s popularity and consistent use of the elephant ensured that it would remain in the American consciousness as a Republican symbol

[Political Animals: Republican Elephants and Democratic Donkeys]

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Bark Angel of Death

“Tree of Dead” production background from The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad, 1949

[HA]

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