Vortext

Samuel Lebowitz poster from Cooper-Hewitt Museum’s ‘Subway’ exhibition in 1977

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I Couldn’t Live Without Your Music

Petula Clark
Sony Hall
November 6

With the sweet sweet sweet sounds of Petula Clark, I would NEVER sleep in the subway, and you shouldn’t sleep on her and her continuing brilliance either!

Just a week til she turns 86(!!!!), the grand lady showed all the geriatrics and me at Sony Hall that she STILL has the golden pipes, swinging and swaying us thru her groovy and classy back catalog, including tackling a handful of choice covers by the likes of John and Paul, Steve Winwood, Andrew Lloyd Webber x 2 and Peggy Lee

Clark’s fantastic performance had an air of sophistication to it, like spending a refined evening with a chanteuse in a dimly lit basement club, exactly outlined in her 1965 hit…

I know a place where the music is fine
And the lights are always low
I know a place where we can go
At the door there’s a man who will greet you
Then you go downstairs to some tables and chairs
Soon I’m sure you’ll be tappin’ your feet
Because the beat is the greatest there
All around there are girls and boys
It’s a swingin’ place, a cellar full of noise
It’s got an atmosphere of its own somehow
You gotta come along right now ’cause I tell you

 

Wherever Petula is – that is the place I want to know, and be at!  THANK YOU PETULA!!

Setlist* – You and I > Meant To Be / Don’t Sleep in the Subway / Fever (Peggy Lee cover) / Who Am I > Colour My World / Look to the Rainbow / How Are Things In Glocca Morra? / While You See A Chance (Steve Winwood cover) / My Love / With One Look (Andrew Lloyd Webber cover) / Blackbird (The Beatles cover) / Imagine (John Lennon cover) / I Know a Place > Sign of the Times / From Now On / 60’s Medley (Round Every Corner>Call Me>Don’t Give Up>The Other Man’s Grass Is Always Greener) / This is My Song (Charlie Chaplin cover) / Don’t Cry for Me Argentina (Andrew Lloyd Webber cover) / Living For Today / I Couldn’t Live Without Your Love / Downtown / Rainbow

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bp3V5M3hmYa/

*to the best of my memory

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License To Fry

Colonel Harland Sanders’ final driver’s license, issued by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in August of 1979, and the Colonel’s wife, Claudia L. Sanders’s license, issued on September 20, 1989 [ha]

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Zoos or Lose

In 1828, when Andrew Jackson was running for president, his opponents were fond of referring to him as a jackass (if only such candid discourse were permissible today). Emboldened by his detractors, Jackson embraced the image as the symbol of his campaign, re-branding the donkey as steadfast, determined, and willful, instead of wrong-headed, slow, and obstinate. Throughout his presidency, the symbol remained associated with Jackson and, to a lesser extent, the Democratic party 

In 1874, cartoonist Thomas Nast, represented the Democratic press as a donkey in lion’s clothing (though the party itself is shown as a shy fox), expressing the cartoonist’s belief that the media were acting as fear mongers, propagating the idea of Ulysses S. Grant as a potential American dictator. In Nast’s donkey-in-lion’s-clothing cartoon, the elephant –representing the Republican vote– was running scared toward a pit of chaos and inflation. The rationale behind the choice of the elephant is unclear, but Nast may have chosen it as the embodiment of a large and powerful creature, though one that tends to be dangerously careless when frightened. Alternately, the political pachyderm may have been inspired by the now little-used phrase “seeing the elephant,” a reference to war and a possible reminder of the Union victory. Whatever the reason, Nast’s popularity and consistent use of the elephant ensured that it would remain in the American consciousness as a Republican symbol

[Political Animals: Republican Elephants and Democratic Donkeys]

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Flat Out Amazing

The Flatiron by Edward Steichen, 1904

just one of a zillion buildings me and the crew saw when we walked the entirety of Manhattan’s Broadway!!

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